How To Cook Fish Like A Chef

Table of contents

 I. THE CATCHING OF UNSHELLED FISH
 II. FISH IN SEASON
III. ELEVEN COURT BOUILLONS
IV. ONE HUNDRED SIMPLE FISH SAUCES
 V. TEN WAYS TO SERVE ANCHOVIES
VI. FORTY-FIVE WAYS TO COOK BASS
VII. EIGHT WAYS TO COOK BLACKFISH
VIII. TWENTY-SIX WAYS TO COOK BLUEFISH
  IX. FIVE WAYS TO COOK BUTTERFISH
   X. TWENTY-TWO WAYS TO COOK CARP
  XI. SIX WAYS TO COOK CATFISH
 XII. SIXTY-SEVEN WAYS TO COOK CODFISH
XIII. FORTY-FIVE WAYS TO COOK EELS
XIV. FIFTEEN WAYS TO COOK FINNAN HADDIE
 XV. THIRTY-TWO WAYS TO COOK FLOUNDER
XVI. TWENTY-SEVEN WAYS TO COOK FROG LEGS
XVII. TWENTY-TWO WAYS TO COOK HADDOCK
XVIII. EIGHTY WAYS TO COOK HALIBUT
  XIX. TWENTY-FIVE WAYS TO COOK HERRING
   XX. NINE WAYS TO COOK KINGFISH
  XXI. SIXTY-FIVE WAYS TO COOK MACKEREL
  XXII. FIVE WAYS TO COOK MULLET
 XXIII. FIFTEEN WAYS TO COOK PERCH
 XXIV. TEN WAYS TO COOK PICKEREL
  XXV. TWENTY WAYS TO COOK PIKE
 XXVI. TEN WAYS TO COOK POMPANO
 XXVII. THIRTEEN WAYS TO COOK RED SNAPPER
 XXVIII. ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY WAYS TO COOK SALMON
   XXIX. FOURTEEN WAYS TO COOK SALMON-TROUT
    XXX. TWENTY WAYS TO COOK SARDINES
   XXXI. NINETY-FIVE WAYS TO COOK SHAD
  XXXII. SIXTEEN WAYS TO COOK SHEEPSHEAD
 XXXIII. NINE WAYS TO COOK SKATE
  XXXIV. THIRTY-FIVE WAYS TO COOK SMELTS
   XXXV. FIFTY-FIVE WAYS TO COOK SOLES
  XXXVI. TWENTY-FIVE WAYS TO COOK STURGEON
 XXXVII. FIFTY WAYS TO COOK TROUT
XXXVIII. FIFTEEN WAYS TO COOK TURBOT
  XXXIX. FIVE WAYS TO COOK WEAKFISH
     XL.    FOUR WAYS TO COOK WHITEBAIT
    XLI. TWENTY-FIVE WAYS TO COOK WHITEFISH
   XLII. EIGHT WAYS TO COOK WHITING
  XLIII. ONE HUNDRED MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES
   XLIV. BACK TALK
    XLV. ADDITIONAL RECIPES

         
 
Chapter 1:  THE CATCHING OF UNSHELLED FISH

 
"First catch your hare," the old cookery books used to say, and hence it is proper, in a treatise devoted entirely to the cooking of Unshelled Fish, to pay passing attention to the Catching, or what the Head of the House terms the Masculine Division of the Subject. As it is evident that the catching must, in every case precede the cooking--but not too far--the preface is the place to begin. Shell-fish are, comparatively, slow of movement, without guile, pitifully trusting, and very easily caught. Observe the difference between the chunk of mutton and four feet of string with which one goes crabbing, and the complicated hooks, rods, flies, and reels devoted to the capture of unshelled fish. An unshelled fish is lively and elusive past the power of words to portray, and in this, undoubtedly, lies its desirability. People will travel for two nights and a day to some spot where all unshelled fish has once been seen, taking $59.99 worth of fishing tackle, "marked down from $60.00 for to-day only," rent a canoe, hire a guide at more than human life is worth in courts of law, and work with dogged patience from gray dawn till sunset.
And for what? For one small bass which could have been bought at any trustworthy market for sixty-five cents, or, possibly, some poor little kitten-fish-offspring of a catfish--whose mother's milk is not yet dry upon its lips.