American Gardener Gardening tips that really work

Table of contents

CHAPTER I  

On the Situation, Soil, Fencing, and Laying out of Gardens  

SITUATION
SOIL
FENCING
LAYING OUT 

CHAPTER II  

On the Making and Managing of Hot Beds and Green houses  

HOT-BEDS 
GREEN HOUSES

CHAPTER III  

On Propagation and Cultivation in general.  

PROPAGATION
TRUE SEED
SOUNDNESS OF SEED
SAVING AND PRESERVING SEED
SOWING
TRANSPLANTING CULTIVATION 

CHAPTER IV  

VEGETABLES AND HERBS 

Description
Those who have gardens already formed and planted, have, of course,  not the situation to choose. But, I am to suppose, that new gardens will, in a  country like this, be continually to be formed; and, therefore, it is an essential part  of my duty to point out what situations are best, as well with respect to the aspect  as to the other circumstances.  
The ground should be as nearly on a level as possible; because, if the  slope be considerable, the heavy rains do great injury, by washing away the soil.  
However, it is not always in our power to choose a level spot; but, if there  be a slope in the ground, it ought, if possible, to be towards the South. For,  though such a direction adds to the heat in summer, this is more than  counterbalanced by the earliness which it causes in the spring.  
By all means avoid an inclination towards the North, or West, and towards  any of the points between North and West. After all, it may not be in our power to  have a level spot, nor even a spot nearly level; and then we must do our best  with what we have.  
I am speaking here solely of a Kitchen garden. Of ornamental Gardening I  shall speak a little in the Chapter on Flowers. From a Kitchen garden all large  trees ought to be kept at a distance of thirty or forty yards.  
For, the shade of them is injurious, and their roots a great deal more  injurious, to every plant growing within the influence of those roots. It is a  common but very erroneous notion, in England, that the trees, which grow in the  hedges that divide the fields, do injury by their shade only.