BMGT330 FULL COURSE

Product DescriptionBMGT330 FULL COURSE [ ALL LEARNING ACTIVITY AND ALL ASSIGNMENT AND CASE ]
Week 2 Learning Activities
Actions for Week 2 Learning Activities
Available after Monday, January 19, 2015 12:00 AM EST. Unlocked: Monday, January 19, 2015 12:00 AM EST – Sunday, January 25, 2015 11:59 PM EST.Must post first.
Learning Activity #1
Legal form (i.e sole proprietorship, partnership etc) is an important aspect to organizational structure. Present a legal form for a venture type and explain your choice. Give example(s) to support your choice and why it is appropriate choice.
Comment on 2 of your classmates’ postings
Learning Activity #2
A brief over view of the most common forms of small business ownership. This is one of a series of talks by Bob Litchfield on Success for Entrepreneurs.
Forms of Business Ownership
Explain how personal conflict can affect partnership and how conflict can be managed effectively?
Week 3 Learning Activities
Actions for Week 3 Learning Activities
Available after Monday, January 26, 2015 12:00 AM EST. Unlocked: Monday, January 26, 2015 12:00 AM EST – Sunday, February 1, 2015 11:59 PM EST.Must post first.
Learning Activity #1
All businesses have to face the uncertainty of market forces. Find a current news story about how a market force is affecting a business and discuss the potential impact, how the business can/is responding and your thoughts on the situation, especially how organizations can effectively manage the risks of market forces and uncertainty.
Learning Activity #2
Please watch the video below and provide your comments
Using Porter’s 5 Forces to Analyze Your Small Business
Week 4 Learning Activities
Actions for Week 4 Learning Activities Available after Monday, February 2, 2015 12:00 AM EST. Unlocked: Monday, February 2, 2015 12:00 AM EST – Sunday, February 8, 2015 11:59 PM EST.Must post first.
Learning Activity #1
Discuss why every entrepreneur should create a business plan ?
For your chosen/hypothetical venture, name and explain two essential elements (i.e Marketing Strategy, Management Team, Products and Services description etc) that will be presented in your business plan?
Post your response and comment on two of your classmates.
Learning Activity #2
Watch the videos below and provide your comments
2. The Simple Truths of Service – Differentiation
Week 5 Learning Activities
Actions for Week 5 Learning Activities
Must post first.
Learning Activity #1
Startup Financing:
Small business financing is a critical issue in the market today; do some research and help us understand why it is so difficult for entrepreneurs to access the funding they need to start a business.
Share at least one source (current/recent article) that addresses this issue.
Learning Activity #2
VIDEO: 10 Ways to Finance and Start a Business – Brian Tracy
One of the key questions that first-time business owners ask is how to finance a business. Watch this video to learn the 10 best and most common ways to help finance your business, whether it is for a small business or a big company.
Web link to video:
Question Actions for Week 6 Learning ActivitiesMust post first.
Learning Activity #1
Franchising continues to be a popular choice for individuals to become small business owners. After reviewing the information in this week’s reading and doing some online research, provide a list of at least three pros and three cons to going the franchise route versus starting the same business on your own. Be sure to list any sources you use. Do not state the same pros/cons that other classmates list.
Learning Activity #2
Advantages and Disavantages of Buying a Business by Bill Bartmann
Informational only, no need to post a comment.
Actions for Week 7 Learning Activities
Locked before Monday, February 23, 2015 12:00 AM EST. Must post first.
Learning Activity #1
The world economy is continuing to transform itself into a mosaic of humanity. New business ventures must consider diversity in all aspects of formation, development and growth. The research on the impact of being deliberate in creating and sustaining a diverse company is pointing to increased impact and performances. Search for a story or research on the diversity and how it relates to entrepreneurship and new venture development. Comment on at least two other classmates’ postings
Learning Activity #2
Discuss what factors an entrepreneur should consider when evaluating a region in which to locate a business? Where are such data available? Post a response and comment on at least one of your classmates post
Actions for Week 8 Learning Activities Available after Monday, February 2, 2015 12:00 AM EST. Unlocked: Monday, February 2, 2015 12:00 AM EST – Monday, March 9, 2015 11:59 PM EDT.Must post first.
Week 8 Learning Activities
Actions for Week 8 Learning Activities
Includes assessment. Must post first.
Learning Activity #1
Share your thoughts on this course and what you learned, specifically how it might help you in developing your start-up business/growing your existing business. Failure to post this week will result in a zero for participation.
Learning Activity #2
Motivational Video: Never Give Up!
Business Plan
Instructions
Business Plan
The final project requires you to develop a comprehensive business plan. This plan should be a working document on how to establish or acquire and operate a business venture.
Required Elements to include in the Business Plan:
• Cover all basic matters, including a description of the business and products/services to be offered, identification of target markets, and analysis of competition. The project will consist of a completed business plan for your real or imaginary business venture. Although there are different types of enterprises, there are commonalities among all. These should be reflected in the following sections:
• there are commonalities among all. These should be reflected in the following sections:
Ø introductory letter
Ø executive summary
Ø statement of objectives
Ø background
Business Plan
The final project requires you to develop a comprehensive business plan. This plan should be a working document on how to establish or acquire and operate a business venture.
Required Elements to include in the Business Plan:
• Cover all basic matters, including a description of the business and products/services to be offered, identification of target markets, and analysis of competition. The project will consist of a completed business plan for your real or imaginary business venture. Although there are different types of enterprises, there are commonalities among all. These should be reflected in the following sections:
Ø introductory letter
Ø executive summary
Ø statement of objectives
Ø background
Ø technical description of product/service
Ø marketing strategy
Ø market data
Ø selling tactics
Ø operations plan
Ø financial data
Ø management plan
Ø human resources plan
Ø conclusions
• Grading will be based on content, comprehensiveness, organization, packaging, grammar, mechanics, and timely submission.
• You may consult with fellow students, use outside sources, or discuss portions of the project in detail with instructor
• The final paper, however, must be your original work.
Required Formatting of Paper:
• Must be typewritten and neatly packaged in a form presentable to a financial institution or investor.
• As some businesses are more complex, no specified number of pages is required. The key is to ensure that all critical portions of the plan are covered in sufficient detail to portray in-depth thought and effort. Some areas may not apply to all businesses.
• Financial statements are important, and you are expected to provide pro forma balance sheets, income statements, break-even analyses, and cash flow projections.
• You should decide early in the course what type of business the plan will involve, as high-quality plans cannot be developed in a short time.
• You should get an early start to perform the research and to prepare a paper that covers all aspects of a business plan.
• Your business plans must be submitted on the date indicated in the course schedule to be eligible for full credit. Plans received after the due date will only be eligible for full credit if the reason for lateness is based on an emergency or otherwise approved by instructor before the due date.
Attachments
Develop the business and marketing strategy for your business plan using the guidance provided below.
Business Strategy:
A. Desired image and position in market
B. SWOT Analysis
C. Competitive Strategy
Marketing Strategy:
a. Target Market
b. Customers’ motivation to buy
c. Market size and trends
d. Advertising and promotion
e. Pricing
f. Distribution strategy (if applicable
Submit your Business Plan progressto your gradebook for review.
Read the attached “True Body Products” Case “Should a Small Company Extend Its Product Line to Satisfy a Key Consumer?”
Answer the 4 questions in the case.
Attach your answer in MS word format to Case Study 2 folder in your gradebook.
1 Should Shade introduce scented soaps to True Body’s product line? Explain?
Q.2 what steps should Shade take to increase the in-store shelf space of True Body’s products?
Q.3 Given Shade’s vision for her company (soaps that are all-natural, unscented, and affordable), do you think that her concerns over the proposed higher prices that Whole Foods would charge for her unscented soaps are justified? Explain.
Case 3 True Body Products
Should a Small Company Extend Its Product Line to Satisfy a Key Customer? In 2007, after spending 15 years in product development and brand management with large companies such as Procter and Gamble, Welch’s, and Seventh Generation, Janice Shade decided to start True Body Products, a company in Richmond, Vermont , that markets all-natural, unscented, affordable soaps. True Body’s line of soaps is manufactured to strict quality standards by a New England contract manufacturer and sold in 45 Whole Foods stores in the Northeast, Fred Meyer stores in the Northwest, and several independent natural food stores across the United States and online at alice.com, an online household products marketplace . In its first full year of operation, True Body generated sales of $45,000. Shade was operating the company using the $100,000 that she and private investors had invested in the company at start-up. The buyer from Whole Foods with whom Shade works recently approached her with an idea for increasing sales of True Body products. “Why not introduce a line of scented soaps?” the buyer asked Shade. Scented soaps would be a natural extension of the small company’s product line, would increase its shelf presence in stores, and would lead to more sales. Shade wanted to avoid alienating or confusing existing customers, many of whom suffered from allergies and purchased True Body products because the soaps were unscented. “The most ardent and positive consumer feedback I get is from people who are happy to have found an unscented bar soap,” she says. However, Shade thought that the idea of adding a scented line was worth considering. “I want my business to grow to a scale where it makes an impression on the world,” she says. Shade began to research scented soaps and consider the options for her company with her advisory board . She asked the company that manufactures her soaps to create samples of soaps scented with fragrances such as lavender and grapefruit. “Then we started costing them out,” says Shade. “That’s when the red flags came up.” Because True Body ‘s soaps are made with all-natural ingredients, the manufacturer would have to use costly pure essential oils rather than cheaper synthetic fragrances to create the line of scented soaps. The result would be higher prices for the scented soaps. Shade estimated that True Body soaps would have to retail for $6.19 for a package of three bars, compared to ju st $5.49 for a package of three unscented bars. The higher pricing concerned Shade because she built her company on the premise of marketing soaps that are all-natural and affordable. In conversations with the buyer, she learned that if she introduced scented soaps, the retailer planned to set the price of both the unscented and the scented soaps at $6.19 for a package of three bars. Concerned that customers would balk at the price increase, Shade considered selling the scented soap in twobar packages, a pricing tactic that would allow her to offer a lower price point. She agreed with the Whole Foods buyer that True Body needed more in-store shelf exposure and began to consider other way s to expand her company’s product line that would be more consistent with her commitment to all-natural, unscented soaps, including liquid hand soap, shampoos, face soap, and others. “I have every intention of growing,” says Shade, “but I want to be intentional about it.” Questions 1. Should Shade introduce scented soaps to True Body’s product line?Explain. 2. What steps should Shade take to increase the in-store shelf space of True Body’s products? 3. Given Shade’s vision for her company (soaps that are all-natural, unscented, and affordable), do you think that her concerns over the proposed higher prices that Whole Foods would charge for her unscented soaps are justified? Explain. 4. Write a one-page memo to Janice Shade outlining the key components of a marketing strategy that will increase her company’s in-store shelf space and its sales. Sources: Adapted from Adriana Gardella, “Can a Small Company Say No to Whole Foods?”New York Times, June I , 20 I 0, http://boss.blogs .nytimes.com/20I 010610 I/can-a-small-company-say-no-to-whol e-foods; Adriana Gardella, “Yes, You Can Say No to Whole Foods,”New York Times, June 4, 20I 0, http://boss.blogs.nyt imes.com/20 I 0/06/04/yes-youcan-say-no-to-whole-foods; and Adriana Gardella, “A Start-Up Soap Maker Startsto Get Traction,”New York Times,January 7, 2011,
WEEK 4
UMUC BMGT330 Informational Interview
UMUC BMGT330 Informational Interview
UMUC BMGT330 WEEK 4 Informational Interview
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