Problem 1 This problem demonstrates the Solution

Add the currency name to the converted amount (e.g., 1.235e2 to 1.235e2 USD) The resulting processing flow (including the chain of responsibility from the previous problem) for CCP is shown schematically in the next figure: Deliverables - The UML class diagram. - A SINGLE MS Word document that includes (i) screenshots showing different execution scenarios (ii) printout of the implementation code. - The code must have graphical user interface to test the functionality. - Softcopy of the implementation code. Write output in exp. notation (e.g., 123.46 to 1.235e2 )  Round output to 2nd decimal (e.g., 123.456 to 123.46) Problem 1 This problem demonstrates the use of the chain of responsibility (COR) design patterns on a simple version of the currency converter program (CCP). The CCP performs conversion from EURO to one of the following three currencies: USD, CAD (Canadian Dollar), and AUD (Australian Dollar). Its user interface looks like this: The input string specifies the amount to be converted and the currency in which it is expressed (see Figure). The CoR pattern will be applied to the processing of the input string to generate a number representing the converted amount. The CCP user interface is seen as a client making a request to convert the input to a given currency. Three handlers are available, one for each currency (USD, CAD, AUD). The resulting processing flow for CCP is shown schematically in the next figure: Deliverables - The UML class diagram. - A SINGLE MS Word document that includes (i) screenshots showing different execution scenarios (ii) printout of the implementation code. - The code must have graphical user interface to test the functionality. - Softcopy of the implementation code. Problem 2 This problem combines the decorator pattern with the CoR implemented in Problem 1. The text appearing in the output field of the CCP UI is a string that has to undergo three decorations:
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