Expert Paper - To persuade your audience

Expert Paper - To persuade your audience

Purpose: To persuade your audience that this particular facet of modern technology either should or shouldn’t be limited due to people’s reliance on it Methods: To use at least six secondary sources to support your argument including   1. A minimum of three articles from Expanded Academic ASAP.

2. A minimum of three secondary sources that you have evaluated according to the guidelines in your textbook (569–573). Audience: Junior and senior-level distance education students enrolled at Penn Foster College The Writing Process Prewriting   1. Since you’re working with a very broad subject, technology, you need to narrow it down to a manageable level. a. Review Chapter 5, “Prewriting,” in your textbook, specifically Choosing and Narrowing a topic (98– 107). b. Reread Chapter 21 in your textbook, “Writing Arguments,” to help you choose a sufficiently narrow topic for your argument essay (526–529)   i. Your argument should make a claim.   ii. Your argument may also call for action.   2. use one of the techniques from Chapter 5 (freewriting, brainstorming, clustering, and so on) to develop your ideas for a topic.  a. Remember, technology is too broad to write about in a short essay, so you need to focus on a specific facet of technology.   3. When you have a list of possible topics for your essay, choose one or two to explore in detail with more freewriting or brainstorming (107–117).  a. Write as much as possible based on what you know, think, believe to be the case, or have heard about your topic.   b. What do you think should be done to address the issues you’ve raised?   4. Draft a “tentative claim” (545) that represents your point of view on the topic. Because an argument essay also acknowledges the opposing point of view (533–34), draft a claim that represents the alternative point of view and brainstorm reasons and evidence you know, think, believe to be the case, or have heard about this side of the issue. Research

1. Your research is integral to your argument essay; however, it plays only a supporting role. At this point, only after you have gathered content in the prewriting process, should you begin the research process, because a. Your use of secondary sources should be limited. b. Secondary sources provide evidence to support your claims. c. You shouldn’t allow secondary sources to take over your argument.   2. use your prewriting to guide your research. Look for evidence that will help to confirm what you know, clarify your point of view, or correct your mistaken beliefs.     3. Go to the library. Your Penn Foster digital library provides resources that will help you to meet the research requirements for your essay, but keep in mind that research in a library, even a digital one, is not like searching online. To learn more, visit the Penn Foster Library site.   4. Keep careful notes on your sources and a working bibliography in order to avoid plagiarism. Organizing   1. use the graphic organizer on page 540 to organize your argument before you begin drafting.   a. Identify each reason clearly and provide related supporting evidence so that you can see your argument in outline form. b. The outline will help you to identify the parts of your argument that don’t fit your thesis statement, where you need more evidence, and where you can reorganize points to make the overall essay more persuasive. Drafting   1. When you’ve completed your graphic organizer or outline, follow your plan to draft your essay. a. Use topic sentences to state your reasons, develop the body of each paragraph logically using the evidence you found in your research   2. Review Chapter 24 on incorporating research into your essay. Be sure to a. introduce borrowed content b. properly punctuate quotations c. provide in-text, or parenthetical, citations for all  secondary sources in MLA format d. use MLA format for your list of works cited   3. Use transitions to help guide you readers to your next point and to move smoothly throughout the argument   1. Review the Flowchart for Revising an Argument Essay (550–551) in your textbook.     2. Use the revision strategies to revise any parts of the essay where you answered “no.” 178  3. Be sure that you’ve edited and proofread (549) your entire essay. Assignment Checklist   1. Argument essay, including list of works cited Submit Your Exam Ensure your exam follows the proper format for submission: n 1-inch margins on all sides n 12 pt. Times New Roman font n Double spacing   1. use the header function in your word-processing program to enter your personal identification and exam information: Student Name ID Number Exam Number Street Address City, State, Zip Email Address   2. Save your exam with the file name: IDNumber_ExamNumber_LastName_FirstName   3. Save your exam in either MS Word or Rich Text Format (.rtf). If an instructor can’t open the file you submit, it will be returned ungraded.    4. When your exam has been evaluated and returned to you, you will be able to review the instructor’s comments by clicking on the View Project button next to the grade and downloading the Instructor Feedback File. If you have trouble viewing the file, please contact an instructor.
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