ENG 295 All Participations

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 ENG/295

CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

 

The Latest Version A+ Study Guide

 

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ENG 295 All Participations Link

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ENG 295 Week 1 Modern Poems by Shel Silverstein
 

Read several poems by Shel Silverstein

The poems in the previous assignment are classic works by classic authors.  The poems in this assignment are by Shel Silverstein and are more modern.  They have great appeal to children.  Some of you may even remember reading some of his books.

Click on the links and read 5-7 of the poems.

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 1 Charlotte Huck’s Children’s Literature, Ch. 6: Poetry
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 1 Electronic Reserve Readings
 

This week’s Electronic Reserve Readings provide context for deeper understanding of this week’s selections of verse, poetry, and nonsense readings. Learn more about the biographies of some of this week’s authors, components of poetry, as well as the meanings of classic lullabies.

Read the following on this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings page:

 

 

 

“Hush-A-Bye Baby: Death and Violence in the Lullaby” by Marina Warner
 

 

“The Forgotten Genre of Children’s Poetry” by Sharon Ruth Gill
 

 

“Playing with Poetry” from Scholastic Parent and Child
 

 

“Introduction: Story and Verse” from Why Lyrics Last
 

 

“And Down Will Come Baby” by Rivka Galchen
 

 

“Nursery Rhymes” by New Princeton Encyclopedia & Poetics
 

 

“Mother Goose” by Clifton Fadiman
 

 

“Poetry” by Sheila A. Egoff
 

 

“Christina Rossetti (1830-1894)” from Dictionary of Women Worldwide
 

 

Christina Rossetti and Illustration, Ch. 3: Books for Children, pp. 91-126
 

 

“Robert Browning” from Britannica Academic
 

 

“Edward Lear” from Encyclopedia of World Biography
 

 

“A Book of Nonsense” by J. R. Holmes
 

 

“Carroll, Lewis (1832-1898)” by P. L. Heath
 

 

The Edinburgh Companion to Robert Louis Stevenson edited by Penny Fielding, Ch. 3: Child Psychology
 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 1 TEDTalks: Natalie Merchant—Singing Old Poems to Life Video Reflection
 

Hearing old poems spoken or sung is how many of us remember our first experience with classic children’s poetry. How does ‘hearing’ a poem transform the written word? Watch Natalie Merchant perform to experience the transformation of old poems into song.

Watch “TEDTalks: Natalie Merchant–Singing Old Poems to Life,” located on this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings page.

Consider the following:

 

 

 

In this performance video, music enhances the spoken word. When listening to Merchant’s performance, what is your emotional response?
 

 

Overall, do you think that the music complements the poetry?
 

 

Would this performance have a similar effect on a child?
 

 

Discuss and respond to your peers throughout the week.

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 1 Once
 

Here’s a little about me.  I am in my 10th year here at UoP (Wow! Time flies!)  I love being an online professor!  I live in MI and in KY.  My husband’s job keeps us on the road quite a bit.

I would love to learn more about you.  Since it is an English class, I like to let you be creative with your postings.  For your intro, I would like for you to tell us about yourself, as usual, but also, please tell us 3 things you have only done once.  The style is sort of poetic and appropriate for this first week.

Here are mine:

Once

Once, I got married.

Once, I lived in England.

Once, I was hit by a drunk driver.

Once, I was lost in Paris.

Once, I survived.

Once.

Your turn.  What did you do only once?  Feel free to put more and make this as poetic as you like (or not is ok too :o).

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 2 Charlotte Huck’s Children’s Literature, Ch. 3: Picturebooks
 

 

Some of the greatest examples of children’s literature are primarily visual in nature. The forms of visual children’s literature include Alphabets; Chapter Books, also called Chapbooks; and Picture Books. Learn more about the interaction of text and image and elements of design used in this genre in Ch. 3 of Charlotte Huck’s Children’s Literature.
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 2 Electronic Reserve Readings
 

Children’s picture books have a long history, and early examples were created with a didactic purpose in mind. As the genre developed, authors often worked as illustrators to create outstanding literacy works. Learn more about this genre and the people who made them in this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings page.

Read the following on this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings page:

 

 

 

“The Role of Illustrations During Children’s Reading” by Karen M. Feathers and Poonam Arya
 

 

“Why We’re Still in Love with Picture Books (Even Though They’re Supposed to Be Dead)” by Allyn Johnston and Maria Frazee
 

 

“The ABC of It: Alphabet Books and the Literature of Fact” by Leonard S. Marcus
 

 

“Golden Age of Children’s Illustrated Books” from Children’s Literature Review, edited by Tom Burns
 

 

“A is for…What? The Function of Alphabet Books” by Perry Nodelman
 

 

Children’s Literature, pp. 134-143 (on chapbooks) of Ch. 6: Canoes and Cannibals: Robinson Crusoe and its Legacies, edited by Seth Lerer
 

 

“Chapbooks Showcase Your Work” by Rita Moe
 

 

“Comenius, Johann Amos (1592-1670)”  from Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood: In History and Society
 

 

“Kate Greenaway” from Encyclopedia of World Biography
 

 

“Geisel, Theodor Seuss (1904-1991)” from Major 21st-Century Writers
 

 

“Macaulay, David” from Continuum Encyclopedia of Children’s Literature
 

 

“Little Brown Sanjay and Little Black Sambo: Childhood Reading, Adult Rereading; Colonial Text and Postcolonial Reception” by Sanjay Sircar
 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 2 Project Gutenberg
 

This week’s readings from the Project Gutenberg site offer wonderful examples of Alphabets, Chapter Books, and Picture Books. Some, such as The Adventure of Two Dutch Dolls and a ‘Golliwogg’ and Little Black Sambo, offer a look at how stereotypical depictions of people of color have presented in literary culture. Be sure to read “Little Brown Sanjay and Little Black Sambo: Childhood Reading, Adult Rereading; Colonial Text and Postcolonial Reception” from the Week 2 Electronic Reserve Readings page in conjunction with these picture books.

Navigate to the Project Gutenberg website.

Search for the following titles in Project Gutenberg. When you have selected and opened the correct text, search for the indicated readings listed beneath each title, below.

Alphabets

A Apple Pie by Kate Greenaway

The Anti-Slavery Alphabet by Anonymous

Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes by Crane, Gilbert, Tenniel, Weir, and Zwecker

Chapter Books

Chap-books of the Eighteenth Century by John Ashton

 

 

 

“Tom Thumb”
 

 

“The History of the Two Children in the Wood”
 

 

“The History of Sir Richard Whittington”
 

 

Picture Books

Struwwelpeter: Merry Stories and Funny Pictures by Heinrich Hoffmann

Under the Window: Pictures & Rhymes for Children by Kate Greenaway

The Real Mother Goose by Blanche Fisher Wright

The Queen of Hearts, and Sing a Song for Sixpence by Randolph Caldecott

The Adventure of Two Dutch Dolls and a ‘Golliwogg’ by Bertha Upton

Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman

The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 2 Moral and Ethical Development and Issues in Children’s Literature
 

Your final assignment for the course involves the selection of three issues related to children’s literature. Carefully review your Week 5 Moral and Ethical Development and Issues in Children’s Literature assignment and use this discussion area to prepare for the successful completion of this assignment.

Refer to the Week 5 Moral and Ethical Development and Issues in Children’s Literature assignment.

Select an issue affecting children’s literature that applies to poetry or picture books.

Post a summary of your reflections.

Discuss and respond to your peers throughout the week.

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 2 Chicken Soup with Rice – Sandek Video
 

Watch this video.  The singer is Carole King and the story and award winning artist illustrations are by Maurice Sandek.

 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 3 Charlotte Huck’s Children’s Literature, Ch. 4: Traditional Literature
 

 

Ch. 4 of Charlotte Huck’s Children’s Literature explores forms of traditional children’s literature such as fables, myths, and legends. Learn more regarding the characteristics of these types of literature by reading the chapter.
 

Hello all,

 

In the Huck text, the authors state, “Questions often arise about which of the available print versions of a tale is the “correct” or authentic text. From a folklorist’s point of view, a tale is recreated every time it is told, and therefore every telling is correct in its own way. A great deal of variation is also acceptable in print versions, where literary style carries the same uniqueness as the teller’s voice” (106).  So is there a right way to tell a story?

 

I am known in my family as being pretty funny.  When I tell a story about something that happened to me and my sister, for instance, I embellish and exaggerate a great deal to make the story better.  My sister says I am lying and I say I am just tell a tall tale.

 

What do you think?  Who’s story is right?  My sister’s boring but true tale or my funny and kind of based on truth tale?  Does it matter?

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 3 Tall Tales
 

Read the article “American Folklore and Tall Tales“ by Grant Oster (2012).

Read the Tall Tale of Paul Bunyan.

Hello All,

What is a Tall Tale?  What is hyperbole?  What makes Tall Tales so culturally significant?

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 3 Read Cinderella
 

 

Compare and Contrast the Grimm’s version of Cinderella to the one of the Disney versions of Cinderella.
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 3 Project Gutenberg
 

Beauty and the Beast. Robin Hood. The Minotaur. Little Red Riding Hood. This week’s readings are an awesome assortment of imaginative tales that have delighted readers for many a moon. Enjoy Perrault’s version of Beauty and the Beast and make sure to read “Perrault’s Little Red Riding Hood” by B. Delaney on this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings page, which discusses the origins and critical analysis of this story.

Navigate to the Project Gutenberg website.

Search for the following titles in Project Gutenberg. When you have selected and opened the correct text, search for the indicated readings listed beneath each title, below.

Animal Fables

Æsop’s Fables, Embellished with One Hundred and Eleven Emblematical Devices

 

 

 

“The Fox without a Tail”
 

 

“The Fox and the Crow”
 

 

Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling

 

 

 

“How the Camel Got His Hump”
 

 

Fairytales

English Fairy Tales by Joseph Jacobs

 

 

 

“Jack the Giant Killer”
 

 

Beauty and the Beast by Madame Leprince de Beaumont

Grimm’s Fairy Stories by Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm

 

 

 

“Hansel and Grethel”
 

 

Stories from Hans Andersen by H. C. Andersen

 

 

 

“The Nightingale”
 

 

Tales of Passed Times by Charles Perrault

 

 

 

“Little Red Riding-Hood”
 

 

Myths and Legends

A Wonder Book and Tanglewood Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne

 

 

 

“The Minotaur”
 

 

The Adventures of Odysseus and The Tales of Troy by Padraic Colum

 

 

 

Part II, Section IV
 

 

Holiday Stories for Young People by Margaret Elizabeth Munson Sangster

 

 

 

“The Pied Piper of Hamelin: A Child’s Story” by Robert Browning
 

 

Amusing Prose Chap Books by Robert Hays Cunningham

 

 

 

“The Famous Exploits Of Robin Hood, Little John, And His Merry Men All, Chapter III: Robin Hood and Little John”
 

 

The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle

 

 

 

“Robin Hood and Guy of Gisbourne”
 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 3 Moral and Ethical Development and Issues in Children’s Literature
 

Hello All,

 

There are some really strange reasons why people want to ban books.  Language is a big one.  It seems violence is OK but add a swear word and people are up-in-arms about a book!

 

Strangely, violence is rarely a reason to ban a book.  Our society is much more tolerant of people hurting and even killing each other than people making love or even swearing.  I find this very odd but it does seem to be true.

 

Words like “jackass” to describe a donkey or “bitch” as a female dog are not even tolerated.  There was a case a few years back where an award (Newbery Metal) winning novel called The Higher Power of Lucky  by Susan Patron (2006) was banned because the word “scrotum” appeared on the first page.  It was in reference to a dog getting bit by a rattlesnake on his scrotum.  This is the CORRECT word and yet many, many had an issue with this and wanted the book banned because of it. Now, in this case, they could have picked any of a dozen other reasons to have an issue with this book as it dealt with substance abuse, childhood and adult traumas, electrocution and other issues but some took issue with a technically correct usage of the word “scrotum.”

 

What do you think about banning over words?

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 4 Charlotte Huck’s Children’s Literature, Ch. 5: Modern Fantasy
 

 

This week’s text reading explores fantasy and science fiction, two popular genres of children’s and adult literature. Common characteristics and classic and modern-day examples of these genres are discussed in Charlotte Huck’s Children’s Literature.
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 4 Project Gutenberg
 

This week’s readings include a story from the author of The Wizard of Oz, L. Frank Baum, and the full text of Lewis Carroll’s classic Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. One common thread among the diverse readings this week is the concept of maturity, how it develops, as well as how literature instills a sense of imagination. Consider these themes as you review your readings, as you will examine them in this week’s assignment.

Navigate to the Project Gutenberg website.

Search for the following titles in Project Gutenberg. When you have selected and opened the correct text, search for the indicated readings listed beneath each title, below.

Domestic Fiction

Kitty’s Class Day And Other Stories by Louisa M. Alcott

 

 

 

“Psyche’s Art”
 

 

Fantasy

American Fairy Tales by L. Frank Baum

 

 

 

“The Capture of Father Time”
 

 

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Adventure Stories

The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

 

 

 

Chapter I
 

 

The Knights of the Round Table: Stories of King Arthur and the Holy Grail by Frost

 

 

 

“Gawain”
 

 

Science Fiction

Twelve Stories and a Dream by H. G. Wells

 

 

 

“The Stolen Body”
 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 4 Alice in Wonderland Published Reflection
 

The works of Lewis Carroll, Allice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass have captured the public imagination and become a huge part of popular culture. Watch “‘Alice in Wonderland Published,” to discover more about the initial publication of Alice in Wonderland.

Watch “‘Alice in Wonderland Published,” located on this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings page.

Consider the following:

 

 

 

After watching the film, how has your understanding of the story enhanced? How do the illustrations allow for a more adult interpretation of the story?
 

 

Discuss and respond to your peers throughout the week.

Classic for a reason

Does literature reflect cultural or societal values? How are cultural or societal values reflected in classic works such as Alice in Wonderland, for example?

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 4 H. G. Wells: Man Ahead of His Time Reflection
 

As long as science fiction has been a genre, it has often been a precursor to science fact. Although we are yet to develop time machines, watch “H. G. Wells: Man Ahead of His Time” to discover more about his insights into the future.

Watch “H. G. Wells: Man Ahead of His Time,” located on this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings page.

Consider the following:

 

 

 

How was the work of Wells ahead of its time?
 

 

In what way was his work prophetic?
 

 

Discuss and respond to your peers throughout the week.

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 4 Library Visit IV – Fiction
 

 

Visit your local library’s fiction.  Ask the children’s librarian what the popular fiction novels are as well as their personal favorites. Ask the librarian about the current trends in YA (young adult) literature.  What is popular and why? And what impact the Harry Potter Series has had on children’s fiction?
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 5 Charlotte Huck’s Children’s Literature, Ch. 7: Contemporary Realistic Fiction
 

 

This week’s readings from the text discuss current issues in children’s literature. Ch. 7 discusses bias and stereotyping, demonstrating how modern-day children’s literature contends with these issues.
 

Hello All,

 

Realistic fiction sounds like an oxymoron.  But, Huck tries to explain this in the first part of this week’s reading.

 

When I was young, I didn’t like to read anything.  Reading was too difficult.  But, if I was forced to read, I picked realistic fiction.  I liked Judy Blume and other authors who wrote about kids my age with normal problems like schoolwork, friends and relationships, and parents.  Problems I could see myself having.  I didn’t care for sci-fi or fantasy at all.  I didn’t get it.  I didn’t want to have to work to imagine new worlds as read was hard enough without the extra hassle.

 

What realistic fiction and authors were your favorites and why?

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 5 Charlotte Huck’s Children’s Literature, Ch. 9: Nonfiction
 

Hello All,

 

As I mentioned (probably too many times now), I did not like to read as a child.  But, nonfiction was interesting to me because you didn’t need to follow a story to enjoy it.  I liked to look at pictures and then read about what I was looking at.

 

I also really like The Magic School Bus Series by Joanna Cole and Bruce Degen.  But, the authors in our textbook don’t seem to agree.   They caution against allowing children to read nonfiction with story elements. “Although the story element in books like this might help children understand facts, they could also confuse children who are still sorting out real and make believe” (270).

 

Did you read this type as a child?  What do you think about this statement from the Huck book?

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 5 Electronic Reserve Readings
 

Hello All,

 

In the course reserve this week is an article about the controversial picture book “And Tango Makes Three” which is about penguins. Controversy about penguins! It just goes to show people will find any reason to complain.

Tango is a true story about two male penguins at a zoo in NY who made a nest just like the male and female penguin couples did. The zookeepers took an egg from another couple (they had two eggs which I guess they usually only have one egg) and put the egg in the nest of the two male penguins. The males treated just like any other penguin couple and raised the chick.

 

What do you think of this story for very, very young children as it is a picture book?

 

 

The story is well illustrated and sweet.  Here is the page where they get their egg.  I am always looking beyond the words to find out what the author is keeping from us.  That is why I know they took the egg from another nest where they had an extra egg. :o)  Most are unlikely to question where the egg came from.

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

ENG 295 Week 5 Electronic Reserve Readings Videos
 

 

Watch “Indian Heritage in Children’s Books,” located on this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings page. Overall, how important is culture in children’s literature? Why should we include works from various cultures in the canon of children’s literature?
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