CS 6810/7810: Wavelets and Wavelet Algorithms Assignment 4 Curve Analysis with 1D Haar Wavelets.ZIP

CS 6810/7810: Wavelets and Wavelet Algorithms Assignment 4 Curve Analysis with 1D Haar Wavelets

Learning Objectives
1. 1D HWT
2. Curve Analysis
3. Object Detection
Introduction
In this assignment, we will explore some of the ideas discussed in Lecture 4. Speci cally, we will investigate how 1D
HWT wavelets can be used to analyze curve topologies to detect objects. While we will focus on detecting landing pads
of Langstroth beehives, the same curve analysis techniques generalize to curves from other domains.
Figure 1: Pad localization: original image (left); localized pad (right)
Let us state the problem. The left image in Figure 1 is a sample image captured by a Pi camera. The right image
in Figure 1 shows a detected pad. This is, of course, an ideal case. Typically, localized pads have some extra bits and
pieces of grass. The end objective is to take a sample image similar to the left image in Figure 1 and localize a landing pad as close to the ideal case as possible.
Separating Grass from Hive
The rst step is to separate the grass from the hive. The left image in Figure 2 shows the same original image and the
right image in Figure 2 shows the grass texture separated from the hive texture. As can be seen in the right image, the grass texture is indicated by a large presence of white pixels.
I will skip, for the sake of clarity and brevity, how these grass pixels are identi ed. In this assignment, you will work
with images like the right image in Figure 2. The zip archive hw04_images.zip contains all the images. I attached the
archive to the announcement \CS 6810/7810: Spring 2017: Images for Assignment 4" posted around 11:00pm on February
4. The archive contains pairs of images where the images with the letter b are black and white images with white grass pixels corresponding to the original images whose names do not have that sux. For example, 2015-07-27_17-42-44.png
is an original image whereas 2015-07-27_17-42-44b.png is the corresponding black and white image with grass pixels.
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Figure 2: Detection of grass: original image (left); grass (right)
Curve Topology Analysis
Can grass pixels be used to localize landing pads? This is the question that we will explore in this assignment. We can
start with outlining a conceptual border curve separating the grass texture from the hive texture. We do not have to
do it programmatically. This curve is a conceptual construct that makes our analysis easier. The left image in Figure 3
shows an image with a drawn border curve.
Figure 3: Curve topology: curve under grass (left); rst ve segments: at, climb, at, climb, at
We can take a closer look at the topological structure of this curve. Going left to right, the curve starts with a at
segment. A at segment may go slightly down or slightly up but does not have any sharp climbs or declines. This at
segment is shown in the second black and white stripe image from the left. The next topological segment is a sharp climb
shown in the third image from the left. This climb is followed by another at segment shown in the fourth image from
the left. This is followed by another climb in the fth image from the left. The sixth image from the left shows a rather
long at.
The next four segments are shown in Figure 4. There is a decline shown in the second stripe image from the left.
Then there is a at shown in the third image from the left. This at is followed by a climb and a decline shown in the
fourth and fth images from the left, respectively.
Computing Curve Topology
How can one compute elements of the curve topology outlined in the previous section? We can use the notion of horizontal and vertical projections. Let us de ne C[i; j] to be the count of white pixels, where a white pixel is de ned as any pixel
whose value is above some threshold (e.g., 200), in all columns from i to j. If i = j, then C[i; j] is the count of white
pixels in column i. E ectively, C[i; j] is a histogram bar whose height is equal to the count of its white pixels.
Suppose we have decided on how wide our individual bins will be. Then we can take as input an image like the right
image in Figure 2 and move left to right through the image computing all C[i; j] for each valid value of i and j. If all
C[i; j] counts are placed orderly, i.e., from left to right, in an array, they constitute the vertical projection of a given
image. Similarly, we de ne R[i; j] to be the count of white pixels in all rows from i to j. If i = j, then R[i; j] is the count
of white pixels in row i. R[i; j] is a histogram bar whose height is equal to the count of its white pixels. All R[i; j] counts
placed orderly into an array constitute the horizontal project of a given image.
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Figure 4: Curve topology: curve under grass (left); next four segments: decline, at, climb, decline
The 1D HWT can be applied to the vertical and horizontal projections to identify the ats, climbs, and declines by
means of wavelets. Why do we need to identify ats, climbs, and declines in the rst place? Take another look at the left
image in Figure 3. You probably notice two ladder steps. Once you can identify the second ladder step, you are on well on your way to localizing the pad. Obviously, the length of both horizontal and vertical projections must be equal to an integral power of 2. So, when you implement your solution, you may need to pad your horizontal and vertical projections with 0's. Another research variable to investigate is how many iterations of 1D HWT allow you to identify the curve topology best. Toward that end, implement a Java class PadLocalizer that has the following two methods:
public static void localizePad(String originalImageFile,
String grassImageFile,
String outputImageFile) {}
public static void localizePadInDir(String originalDir,
String grassDir,
String outputDir) {}
The rst method takes an original image like the left image in Figure 2, a black and white grass pixel image like the
right image in Figure 2, and a path to an output image. The method does the 1D HWT based analysis of the image in
the second argument to localize the pad, draws the boundary lines of the localized pad in the original image and saves the image with the localized pad in the image speci ed by the third argument. The second method takes three directories:
a directory with original images, a directory with black and white grass pixel images, and a directory where images with drawn localized pads are saved.
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