MTH 219 All participations

MTH 219 All participations

Entire Course Link

https://plus.google.com/u/0/108200033792883877670/posts/dWT4sDYbQKM

 

 MTH/219

INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ALGEBRA

 

The Latest Version A+ Study Guide

 

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MTH 219 All participations Link

https://uopcourses.com/category/mth-219-participations/

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MTH 219 Week 1 Course Introduction and Week 1 Overview
 

Welcome to MTH/219: Introduction to College Algebra!

Students enter this course with many different backgrounds in math. Your classmates range from people who just finished high school algebra to people who may not have used algebra in over 30 years. It is important to get off to a good start by putting in a strong effort early. Depending on your math background, this could require you putting in more time and effort than you might be used to in other classes.

The purpose of this week is to give you a solid foundation in the algebraic skills necessary for the entire course. This includes order of operations and the other skills necessary to solve linear equations and inequalities. It is important to spend time ensuring you have mastered this week’s objectives because the skills needed for this week will be used throughout the rest of this course.

It is normal in Week 1 for some students to feel a bit overwhelmed because math is very different than the other subjects you will be learning throughout your degree program. However, you have a strong support system to help you through the journey including your faculty member, tutors, textbook, videos, classmates, and live events available to help you whenever you need assistance. With enough determination, hard work, and taking advantage of the support available, you can succeed in this course!

Hopes and expectations

What are your hopes for this course? What do you want to learn? What are your fears for this course? What questions do you have for the instructor?

 

 
 

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 1 MyMathLab® Frequently Asked Questions
 

what do you think of MyMathLab?

Hi, All,

Have you had a chance to check out all of the “goodies” in MyMathLab?  One of my favorite things about this computer component is that it is so easy to make 100% on all of your homework activities.  Although this may be a time consuming process, if you miss a question, you can always ask for a different problem to work, and you get another chance at success.

What is your favorite part of MML so far?

 

 
 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 1 Introductory & Intermediate Algebra for College Students, Ch. 1, Sections 1.1, 1.4, & 1.8: Introduction to Algebra: Variables and Mathematical Models
 

Learning Mathematics is like learning a new language. In this chapter you learn how to use the English language to write equations and expressions. Once you have gotten the hang of using English words to translate into mathematics you will check to see if a given number is the answer to a problem.

Your Ch. 1 reading also supports your Week 1 MyMathLab® assignment. The reading provides you step by step examples in case you get stuck or lost in MyMathLab®.

 

 
 

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 1 Getting Acquainted
 

 

Personal Bio
 

Hello, and welcome to MTH219,

My name is Sharon Totten, and I will be the facilitator for this class.  Below is my bio.  Please share your bio in this thread, too. I look forward to reading it and meeting you all.

I was born and raised in Fort Payne, Alabama, and although I have lived several different places in the US, I now find myself situated back in my old home town.

I raised my three boys in Fort Payne, but like many small town boys, they decided to “get out of town” as quickly as they could.  They have all gravitated to large cities, and thanks to them, I now get to enjoy traveling among different cities like Atlanta, Georgia…Birmingham, Alabama…Seattle, Washington…and many cities in between.

I am currently the Director of Advising at Northeast Alabama Community College in Rainsville, Alabama, but I spent the last eight years as a full-time math instructor, here.   Before landing at NACC eight years ago, I spent 17 years in a public school system as a math teacher, English teacher, and/or assistant principal. I have worked at all levels of the educational system from pre-K through college, and I can honestly say that I have enjoyed them all!

In my spare time (what’s that?) I enjoy running, biking, Zumba and yoga. I have recently picked up the urge to learn about pottery, and enjoy “hanging out” at a pottery studio in Scottsboro, Alabama. Although I am not very good at it yet, I do enjoy working with the clay, and have hopes of actually making something recognizable in the near future.

Teaching is my passion.  I cannot imagine being happier doing anything else.  I truly believe in the power of the human mind, and I suppose that my philosophies are that we are never too old to learn, and that there is nothing we cannot do (to some degree) if we set our minds toward accomplishing it.

 

 
 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 1 Live Math Tutoring
 

Join a Live Math Tutoring session any time by clicking the link within the Interactive/Tutorial tab.

In the session, become familiar with the whiteboard environment and the tools used in the whiteboard.

Discuss math questions you have with a tutor.

Note: Tutors can help you with the practice areas in the MyMathLab® Study Plan, but not for the Quiz Me areas in the MyMathLab® Study Plan or for the Weekly MyMathLab® Checkpoint assignments.

 

What is the difference between Live Math Tutoring and Live Labs?

Live Math Tutoring is available 24 hours a day, 7 days per week. Live Math Tutoring connects you with a tutor.

Live Labs are facilitated by a University of Phoenix faculty member and have the potential for group learning if others are in the lab at the same time.

 

Which service should I use?

If you get stuck and need help, you are encouraged to seek out assistance in Live Labs if the labs run at the time that is convenient for you. If Live Labs are not running at a time that is convenient, you are encouraged to join a Live Math Tutoring session. You can get the help you need with either service.

 

Hi, Class,

I highly encourage you to try the live tutoring that is available 24/7.  This is an incredible resource that will definitely help you achieve success.  The tutors are patient and knowledgeable.  It is just like having your on teacher there with you.

 

I tried the service, myself, just to see how it worked.  Why not try it yourself?  Pick a problem or two from this week’s Study Plan and “test the tutors” to see how the process works.  I can just about guarantee that you will love the help you receive so much that you will want to come back and use it again and again!

 

 
 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 2 Overview
 

In Week 1 we built a solid foundation in algebraic skills to solve linear equations. It can also be helpful to visualize and graph those equations. Graphs can give us an easier ability interpreting equations that represent real-world scenarios. This week emphasizes the use of technology to visualize, interpret, analyze, and make conclusions about equations and functions. Linear equations are straight lines on a graph. An example of a linear equation is y = 3x + 4. This week we begin working with other types of polynomials. An example of a polynomial is y = 2x2 + 5x + 6. Working with polynomials that have variables with exponents greater than one will lay a foundation for you to create graphs and equations with curved lines. This will allow you to use math for a greater variety of real-world applications. This week you also determine the domain and range of a function, which helps you determine the boundaries of possibility for real-world problems.

As you may have realized, this course moves at a fast pace. It is worth the sacrifice, hard work, and determination that is required to succeed. Use the assistance in the forms of videos, live labs, and tutoring that are available to you. You can do it!

 

 
 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 2 Introductory & Intermediate Algebra for College Students, Ch. 3, Sections 3.1 & 3.3: Linear Equations in Two Variables
 

 

In Ch. 3 you continue to learn about graphs of linear equations. You explore how graphs are created and continue to expand your mathematical vocabulary. An important part of graphing that this reading covers is how to determine the rate of change from a graph using the slope.
 

 

 

 

View one of the following Week 2 videos: 

 

 

 

Khan Academy’s “What is a function“
 

 

Patrick Just Math Tutorials: “The Vertical Line Test“
 

 

Khan Academy’s “Evaluating a Function: Formula“
 

 

Khan Academy’s “Evaluate a Function: Graph“
 

 

 
 

 

What are the various ways of representing a function? What methods can you use to determine whether a relation is a function? Give an example of a relation and determine if it is a function.

 

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 2 Introductory & Intermediate Algebra for College Students, Ch. 5, Sections 5.1-5.2 & 5.5: Exponents and Polynomials
 

 

In Week 1 you learned about linear equations and inequalities with one variable like x or y.  You learned how to solve those equations and check your answer. This week in Ch. 5 you learn about polynomials. This chapter explains how to add, subtract, multiply and divide polynomials. Take a deep breathe! Operating with polynomials can be difficult for some students, but there are a lot of resources to help you along the way.
 

 

 

 

View one of the following Week 2 Videos: 

 

 

 

Patrick Just Math Tutorials: “Polynomials: Adding, Subtracting, Multiplying, and Simplifying“
 

 

Khan Academy’s “Dividing Polynomials with Remainders: Monomial Divisors“
 

 

 
 

 

Why can we only combine like terms? What might be the result of combining terms that are not alike? Provide an example in your explanation.

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 2 Videos
 

Watch the Week 2 videos.

The weekly videos give you an opportunity to learn this week’s material in a format similar to a traditional faculty lesson presentation. The videos give an explanation of the weekly concepts and cover examples similar to the types of problems you will solve in this week’s assignments. It is recommended that you pause, rewind, and replay the videos as many times as needed to understand the material.

 

 
 

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 2 Right Brain v Left Brain Quick Test
 

Many math students claim that they are “not good at math”.  My theory is that anyone can be good at math; he/she just needs to learn according to his/her best learning style.

Are you right brain dominant, or left?  Take this little “test”, do a little research, and see if you agree with the outcome. List some different ways to help you learn better, and share these ideas with your class members through our discussion board.

Reference: Right brain v left brain . (2007). Retrieved from http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/right-brain-v-left-brain/story-e6frf7jo-1111114603615

 

 
 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 3 Overview
 

 

In Week 1, we learned the foundations of algebra and solved linear equations and inequalities. Last week, we expanded that knowledge to graphing linear equations, which are straight lines. Last week we also performed operations on other types of polynomials which can be curved lines when graphed as equations. This week’s objectives are designed to give you a solid foundation in factoring. Factoring is necessary to find roots of a polynomial, which can tell us important information about an equation or graph when they represent a real-world application. Factoring also helps us simplify and solve rational expressions which are skills we learn and use in Week 4. You should also be able to use technology (like desmos, a graphing calculator, or Microsoft®Excel) to graph and analyze polynomial functions for zeros. We are at the halfway point of this class. While the material in this course is challenging, you can learn it with enough determination. Do not hesitate to ask for help when you need it.
 

 

 
 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 3 Introductory & Intermediate Algebra for College Students, Ch. 6, Sections 6.1-6.4 & 6.6: Factoring Polynomials
 

 

In Ch. 6 you learn how to undo what you learned in Ch. 5 section 5.2. Factoring is taking apart a polynomial that is multiplied together. Factoring is challenging. You may want to spend extra time reviewing this reading. Think of each problem as a puzzle that you are trying to solve. It is ok if you do not understand factoring right away. It takes most students hours of practice and effort to master factoring. You can do it!
 

 

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 3 Videos
 

Watch the Week 3 videos.

The weekly videos give you an opportunity to learn this week’s material in a format similar to a traditional faculty lesson presentation. The videos give an explanation of the weekly concepts and cover examples similar to the types of problems you will solve in this week’s assignments. It is recommended that you pause, rewind, and replay the videos as many times as needed to understand the material.

Solving Quadratic Equations

 

 

 

View the following Week 3 video: 

 

 

 

Patrick Just Math Tutorials: “Solving Quadratic Equations by Factoring – Basic“
 

 

 
 

 

Is it possible to solve every quadratic equation by factoring? Why or why not?

 

 
 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 3 An easier way to multiply
 

 

For those of you who have struggled wiith multiplication…or those of you who just like cool math tricks. 
 

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 3 A More Advanced Right-brain/Left-brain Quiz
 

 

Many students believe that they are “no good” at math.  Often, however, they were taught by someone who had a different dominant brain style, and did not teach in the best manner for those students to learn.  Take this quiz and see where you fall in the spectrum.  The link for the quiz is at the right under “Student Materials”
 

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 4 Overview
 

In Week 1 we solved linear equations and set a solid foundation for algebra. In Week 2 we expanded to graphing linear equations and introduced polynomials. In Week 3 we learned to factor and graph polynomials. This week we focus on rational expressions, equations, and functions. A rational expression is a fraction with polynomials in the top and bottom halves of the fraction. Many real-life problems rely on rational expressions for the solution; for example, an artist uses proportions to scale up a drawing, or a manager can calculate how fast a job can be done by combining the rates of two employees. Even software development requires the use of rational expressions. This week we also use proportions, which are two fractions that are equal to one another. Because rational expressions are fractions that contain polynomials, proportions often come in the form of two rational expressions that are equal to one another. This week’s objectives are designed to allow you to simplify, analyze, and solve problems involving rational expressions and rational equations. Each week we have added more math tools and skills so that we can apply math to a greater variety of real-world applications. The concepts in this week require skills that you may have never used before. By focusing yourself to overcome the difficulties of learning the material, you increase your ability to think critically and overcome a greater variety of challenges in life. You are almost to the finish line for this course! Keep going strong!

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 4 Introductory & Intermediate Algebra for College Students, Ch. 7, Sections 7.1-7.4 & 7.6-7.7: Rational Expressions
 

This chapter teaches you how to simplify, add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational expressions. An important thing to take away from each one of these tasks is to determine the undefined terms. This allows you to understand what solutions are possible for each situation.

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 4 Videos
 

Watch the Week 4 videos.

The weekly videos give you an opportunity to learn this week’s material in a format similar to a traditional faculty lesson presentation. The videos give an explanation of the weekly concepts and cover examples similar to the types of problems you will solve in this week’s assignments. It is recommended that you pause, rewind, and replay the videos as many times as needed to understand the material.

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 4 C.I.T.E Learning Styles Inventory
 

Go above and beyond the Right brain/left brain quizzes, and learn even more about yourself.  Complete the Learning Styles Inventory to find out which is your primary learning style.  Then do “a little research” on that learning style, and share with the class some things that will help you learn best.  Be sure to cite your resources in correct APA style (see the UOPX Center for Writing Excellence for help with citations) so that your classmates may also find and benefit from your research.

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 5 Overview
 

We have arrived at Week 5! Pat yourself on the back for all of the hard work you have put into learning algebra. Functions have applications in nearly every part of society. During this week, you will create, analyze, and perform operations on functions. We continue to build on the foundation of what we have learned in the first four weeks of this course and apply them to functions. The use of functions and equations to analyze data is an integral part of modern math. Keep going strong. You are almost to the finish line!

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 5 Introductory & Intermediate Algebra for College Students, Ch. 7, Section 7.8: Rational Expressions
 

In Section 7.8 you learn about modeling using Variation. Variation describes the relationship of what happens to one variable when another variable changes value at a constant rate. There are three types of variation you will learn about: Direct, Inverse and Joint variation. An example of Direct variation is y = 5x. In this example, if x is increased by 1, y is increased by 5. Read this section to learn about each type of variation and how they can represent real-world applications.

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 5 Introductory & Intermediate Algebra for College Students, Ch. 8, Sections 8.3-8.4: Basic Functions
 

Congrats on getting to the final reading of the course! In Ch. 8 you finish learning about functions for this course. This chapter focuses on Composite and Inverse Functions. This reading will help you gain a larger math vocabulary. If you do not understand a term, look it up on the internet. There may be a definition on the internet that resonates with you more than the definitions in this reading. Keep up all the hard work! You are close to the finish line.

 

 

 

View one of the following Week 5 videos: 

 

 

 

Patrick Just Math Tutorials: “Composition of Functions“
 

 

Khan Academy’s “Evaluating Composite Functions: Using Graphs“
 

 

 
 

 

Write an equation to represent f(x) and g(x). Describe a method you can use to evaluate f(g(2)). Would the answer be the same as g(f(2))? Why or why not?

Note: All Khan Academy content is available for free at www.khanacademy.org.

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 5 Videos
 

Watch the Week 5 videos.

The weekly videos give you an opportunity to learn this week’s material in a format similar to a traditional faculty lesson presentation. The videos give an explanation of the weekly concepts and cover examples similar to the types of problems you will solve in this week’s assignments. It is recommended that you pause, rewind, and replay the videos as many times as needed to understand the material.

 

 

 

MTH 219 Week 5 Math Jokes
 

Everyone needs to have a little fun in Week 5.  Take a break and see if any of the math jokes on the linked website will tickle your funny bone.
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