Computer Science 1 Homework 3 Lists and If statements Solved

Part 1: How Have the Popular Baby Names Changed?
Create a folder for HW 3. Download the zip file hw3Files.zip from Piazza. Put it in this folder and unzip it. You should see read_names.py names_example.py top_names_1880_to_2014.txt hw3_util.py legos.txt
The first three will be used in this part, while part 2 will use hw3_util and legos.txt. Do all of your work for part 1 in this folder. Start by opening names_example.py in the Wing IDE and then read the following...
We have data from the Social Security Administration that gives the top 250 female and male baby names for every year from 1880 up to and including 2014, and also gives you how many babies were given each name. These data are stored the file top names 1880 to 2014.txt.
We have also provided you with a module called read names.py that gives you easy access to this data. The program names_example.py provided to you and shown here illustrates the use of this module and the resulting lists:
’ ’ ’
I n i t i a l example to demonstrate how to read and access the baby names and counts .
’ ’ ’
import read names
# Read in a l l the names . The result is stored in the module . read names . read from file (”top names 1880 to 2014 . txt”)
# Access the female names and counts for 1886
( female names , female counts ) = read names . top in year (1886 , ’ f ’ )
print(”The most common female name in 1886 , with a count of {:d} , is {: s}”\
. format( female counts [0] , female names [ 0]) )
# Access the male names and counts for 1997. Note that the 100 th most # popular name is in position 99 of the l i s t .
(male names , male counts ) = read names . top in year (1997 , ’M’ ) print(”The 100th most common male name in 1997 , with a count of {:d} , is {: s}”\
. format( male counts [99] , male names [99]))
Play around with code until you understand what it is doing and how to work with the two lists that are returned. Only when you are comfortable should you proceed to the actual assignment... Write a program that does the following:
1. It asks the user for a year in the range from 1880 up to and including 2014. It should check to see if the year is in the appropriate range and if it is not the program should print an error message (see example below) and stop.
2. It asks the user for a female name and finds the index of the name in the list.
3. It then finds the index of the name at plus and minus 5 and 10 years from the selected date, ignoring any dates that are outside of the 1880 - 2014 range.
4. At this point, for each valid year in the test set year-10, year-5, year, year+5, year+10, if the name was not found in that year the program should print a message saying it was not found. If the name was found in that year it outputs the statistics about the name including the year tested, the rank, the count, the percentage of the count relative to the count of the top ranked name, and the percentage of the name relative to the sum of all the name counts in the top 250. For any index less than 0 or greater than 249, nothing should be printed.
5. It should ask for a male name and do the same.
Example output when running from the Wing IDE is below. Formatting should use 3 spaces for the rank {:3d}, 5 spaces for the count ({:5d}), and 7 spaces for each percentage ({:7.3f}).
First example
Enter the year to check = 2014
2014
Enter a female name = Emma
Emma
Data about female names Emma:
2004: 2 21599 86.310 2.145
2009: 2 17881 80.263 1.925
2014: 1 20799 100.000 2.321
Enter a male name = Jonathan Jonathan
Data about male names Jonathan :
2004: 21 14357 51.512 1.034
2009: 29 11359 53.722 0.877
2014: 44 8035 41.971 0.665
Second example
Enter the year to check = 1952
1952
Enter a female name = Mary Mary
Data about female names Mary:
1942: 1 63238 100.000 5.587
1947: 2 71684 71.914 4.807
1952: 2 65681 97.891 4.238
1957: 1 61096 100.000 3.657
1962: 2 43497 94.388 2.784
Enter a male name = Jackson
Jackson
Data about male names Jackson :
1942: Not in the top 250
1947: Not in the top 250
1952: Not in the top 250
1957: Not in the top 250
1962: Not in the top 250
Third example
Enter the year to check = 2015
2015
Year must be at least 1880 and at most 2014
Here are several notes to help you.
If you import a module called sys then you can stop your program from executing with the statement sys.exit(). This is a nice thing to be able to do when you find an error in your input.
You can easily pass lists as arguments to functions. For example
def total and avg ( one list ):
n = len ( one list )
total = sum( one list )
avg = total / float (n)
print ( ’ f i r s t {:d} , total {:d} , avg {:5.2 f } ’. format ( one list [0] , total , avg )
y = [ 8 , 2 , 4 , 5 ] total and avg ( y )
Writing one or two functions can make the code much, much simpler. One function might be given as parameters a single name, the year, the list of names and the list of counts, and from these it can print a line of the table. The function would be called once for each year and would ignore years outside of the valid range. A second function, called from within this first function, might calculate and print the statistics for a given index in the counts list, or perhaps return the statistics as a tuple.
The following example will help you understand how to find if a value is in the list and the list index.
a = [165 , 32 , 89 , 16 ]
x = 32
x in a
True
i = a . index (x)
i
1
print (a [ i ] , a [ i +1])
32 89
183 in a
False
j = a . index (183)
Traceback (most recent call last ):
File ”<stdin ”, line 1 , in <module ValueError : 183 is not in l i s t
Note that it is an error to ask for an index that is not in the list!
When you are finished, submit your program to Submitty as hw3Part1.py. You must use this filename, or your submission will not work in Submitty. You do not have to submit any of the files we have provided. Note that you do not need loops for this part. Use the appropriate list functions such as sum and find to generate the answers. Use of loops will be penalized in the grading.
Part 2: Legos (Everything is awesome!)
In celebration of everyone’s childhood, we have a lego problem in this homework. We will solve a simple problem in this part.
Suppose you are given a list of lego pieces that you own, but you have a new project. You want to see if you have enough of a specific piece. But, you can put together different lego pieces to make up bigger pieces too.

1x1 2x1 2x2 2x4

2x2 2x2 2x4
Figure 1: All the possible lego pieces for this homework are shown on the top row. The name explains the dimensions of the lego. The bottom row shows how you can combine two 2x2 pieces to make up a 2x4 piece.
Write a program to read from a file the list of all lego pieces you currently have. Then, ask the user for the type of lego piece that she is searching for. If the lego type is not in the list of possible pieces, print out Illegal lego and exit Otherwise, print out how many of that piece you can make using the legos in your collection. You will only consider methods in which one type of lego is repeated. For example, you can make up a 2x4 lego using: two 2x2 legos, or four 2x1 legos, or eight 1x1 legos. In other words, you do not consider the possibility of using two 2x1 legos and four 1x1 legos.
Let’s assume you have the following lego pieces available to you:
1x1, 6
2x1, 2
2x2, 2
2x4, 1
Here are some sample outputs of your program:
What type of lego do you need? == 2x4
2x4
I can make 2 2x4 pieces:
1 pieces of 2x4 using 2x4 pieces.
1 pieces of 2x4 using 2x2 pieces.
0 pieces of 2x4 using 2x1 pieces.
0 pieces of 2x4 using 1x1 pieces.
What type of lego do you need? == 2x1
2x1
I can make 5 2x1 pieces:
0 pieces of 2x1 using 2x4 pieces.
0 pieces of 2x1 using 2x2 pieces.
2 pieces of 2x1 using 2x1 pieces.
3 pieces of 2x1 using 1x1 pieces.
What type of lego do you need? == 4x2
4x2
Illegal lego
To solve this problem, you will first read from a file how many of each type of lego pieces you currently have using the function provided in hw3_util as follows:
import hw3_util legos = hw3_util.read_legos('legos.txt') print(legos)
If you execute this code with the above file, you will get the legos list below.
['1x1', '1x1', '1x1', '1x1', '1x1', '1x1', '2x1', '2x1', '2x2', '2x2', '2x4']
A very easy way to solve this problem is to use the count() function of lists. For example, given the above list, legos.count('1x1') returns 6. You need to write the if statements to check for each lego, whether a substitute exists.
It should be obvious how you can put smaller pieces together to make up bigger pieces, but we provide possible substitutions here for completeness. We only use one type of lego for any request, no mix and match.
Piece Possible replacement
2x1 2 1x1
2x2 2 2x1
4 1x1
2x4 2 2x2
4 2x1
8 1x1
Note that we only gave you one test file. But, you must create other test files to make sure that the program works for all possible cases. Feel free to share your test files on Piazza and test cases. Discussing test cases on Piazza are a good way to understand the problem.
We will test your code with different input files than the one we gave you in the submission server. So, be ready to be tested thoroughly!
When you are finished, submit your program to Submitty as hw3Part2.py. You must use this filename, or your submission will not work in Submitty. You do not have to submit any of the files we have provided. Note that you do not need loops for this part. Use the appropriate list functions. Use of loops will be penalized in the grading.
As an important final note: It is easy to overcomplicate this problem by doing calculations based on the sizes of the legos. You do none of this!! You should write your code assuming that the only legos that can possibly exist are '1x1', '2x1', '2x2' and '2x4' and you should hard-code all of the replacements outlined above.
Part 3: Turtle moves!
Suppose you have a Turtle that is standing in the middle of an image, at coordinates (200,200) facing right (along the dimensions). Assume top left corner of the board is (0,0) like in the images.
You are going to read input from the user five times. Though you do not have to use a loop for this part, it will considerably shorten your code to use one. It is highly recommended that you use a loop here. However, using a loop in place of simple list functions such as sorting will incur penalties during grading.
Each user input will be a command to the Turtle. You are going to execute each command as it is entered, print the Turtle’s current location and direction. At the same time, you are going to put all the given commands in a list, sort this resulting list at the end of the program and print it as is (no other formatting).
Here are the allowed commands:
move will move Turtle 20 steps in its current direction. jump will move Turtle 50 steps in its current direction.
turn will turn the Turtle 90 degrees counterclockwise: right, up, left, down.
sleep will keep the turtle in the same spot for two turns.
If user enters an incorrect command, you will do nothing and skip that command. You should accept commands in a case insensitive way (move, MOVE, mOve should all work).
There is a fence along the boundary of the image. No coordinate can be less than 0 or greater than 400. 0 and 400 are allowed. We realize that not all boundaries can be reached in 5 turns, but check it anyway. It will make the program less fragile should we make the number of turns variable in a later homework.
You must implement two functions for this program:
move(x,y,direction,amount)
will return the next location of the Turtle as an (x,y) tuple if it is currently at (x,y), facing direction (direction one of right, up, left, down) and moves the given amount.
turn(direction)
will return the next direction for the Turtle currently facing direction, moving counterclockwise.
Now, write some code that will call these functions for each command entered and update the location of the Turtle accordingly. Here is an example run of the program:
Turtle : (200 , 200) facing : right
Command (move,jump , turn , sleep ) = turrn turrn
Turtle : (200 , 200) facing : right Command (move,jump , turn , sleep ) = turn turn
Turtle : (200 , 200) facing : up
Command (move,jump , turn , sleep ) = Move
Move
Turtle : (200 , 180) facing : up
Command (move,jump , turn , sleep ) = turn turn
Turtle : (200 , 180) facing : l e f t Command (move,jump , turn , sleep ) = jumP jumP
Turtle : (150 , 180) facing : l e f t
All commands entered : [ ’ turrn ’ , ’turn ’ , ’Move’ , ’turn ’ , ’jumP ’ ] Sorted commands: [ ’Move’ , ’jumP’ , ’turn ’ , ’turn ’ , ’ turrn ’ ]
In the above example, turrn is an invalid command, so it has no effect in the Turtle’s state. In case you are wondering, the list is sorted by string ordering, which is called lexicographic (or dictionary) ordering.
Here is a second example:
Turtle : (200 , 200) facing : right
Command (move,jump , turn , sleep ) = sleep sleep
Turtle f a l l s asleep .
Turtle : (200 , 200) facing : right
Turtle is currently sleeping . . . no command this turn . Turtle : (200 , 200) facing : right
Command (move,jump , turn , sleep ) = Move
Move
Turtle : (220 , 200) facing : right Command (move,jump , turn , sleep ) = turn turn
Turtle : (220 , 200) facing : up
Command (move,jump , turn , sleep ) = sleep sleep
Turtle f a l l s asleep .
Turtle : (220 , 200) facing : up
All commands entered : [ ’ sleep ’ , ’Move’ , ’turn ’ , ’ sleep ’ ] Sorted commands: [ ’Move’ , ’ sleep ’ , ’ sleep ’ , ’turn ’ ]
When you are finished, submit your program to Submitty as hw3Part3.py. You must use this filename, or your submission will not work in Submitty.
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