A Woman's Way Through Unknown Labrador  (Mina Hubbard)

A Woman's Way Through Unknown Labrador (Mina Hubbard)

A Woman’s Way Through Unknown Labrador An Account of the Exploration of the Nascaupee and George Rivers by Mrs. Leonidas Hubbard, Junior
read by Janet Russell
Listening Time: Approx. nine hours
10-digit ISBN: n/a
13-digit ISBN: n/a

A Woman’s Way Through Unknown Labrador: An Account of the Exploration of the Nascaupee and George Rivers by Mrs. Leonidas Hubbard, Junior was first published in October 1908.

Mina Hubbard was a genteel Edwardian American widow of thirty-five, who had only seen bears in “a Zoo.” But the death from starvation of her husband, Leonidas Hubbard, in 1903 in the wilds of unmapped Labrador, prompted this spirited woman to hire native guides and lead them on the same journey into the Labrador interior in 1905 that her husband had failed to complete two years earlier. Despite social disapproval and woods experience limited to the occasional fishing trip in the US, Mina Hubbard canoed and portaged hundreds of miles into the wilderness with her sextant and her Kodak, successfully completing her husband’s mission. She also managed to beat his friend Dillon Wallace, who set out on the same day and in the same place as Mina (North West River, Labrador), to the finish line in Ungava Bay.

Mina Hubbard was a courageous woman with an open mind and heart. In A Woman’s Way Through Unknown Labrador, the listener is invited to share her elegantly worded, astute observations of an untouched, pristine land populated with Innu and “livyeres,” caribou, bear, muskrat, geese, and loons, a place of pain and beauty for the woman whose husband perished there. Her careful maps of the uncharted land she journeyed through were in use until the advent of aerial photography.

REVIEWS

“An interesting tale of wilderness survival and the awesome power of a woman who is . . . absolutely fearless.” Goodreads.com "A Woman's Way Through Unknown Labrador is worthy of the same attention given to prominent exploration and travel writers on the Canadian North and should be recognized as part of the canon of Victorian travel-writing and women's autobiography.” Carolyn Podruchny, History, Western Michigan University



This Canadian audiobook recording brought to you by Rattling Books of Newfoundland and Labrador.
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