Social Narratives as an Evidence-Based Practice to Support Employment of Young Adults with ASD

ABSTRACT

The statistical data reports that current unemployment rates for young adults with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in the United States is bleak. In 2004, Hurlbutt and Chalmers noted that difficulties obtaining and keeping employment are many times connected to issues involving social interactions and communication skills rather than performing specific job skills. Research from Wehman, et al. (2012) recently noted that students with ASD with access to intensive strategy training have more employment potential than previously realized. In addition, Klin, Volkmar and Sparrow (2000) note that there is a need to explicitly teach social skills to enhance the chance of employability. The purpose of this article is to give teachers, service providers, parents, job coaches and/or employers practical evidence-based strategies in the use of social narratives to support employment for young adults with an ASD.
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