Lab Assignment 2 Solution

Goals:
1. Understanding of heaps and interfacing with a dictionary.
2. Understanding of the five steps for developing a dynamic programming solution.
Requirements:
1. Use C to implement algorithms for (a) approximate order-preserving Huffman coding - each phase
merging two adjacent subtrees whose weights give the smallest sum, and (b) exact order-preserving
Huffman coding - using a dynamic programming formulation as described in Notes 07.C.
The input is 1) a positive integer n and 2) a sequence of n positive integers giving the frequency
counts (weights) for symbols in an ordered character set.
For both types of subtrees, your program should output the bit code assigned to each symbol and the
weighted sum

lengthi • counti
i
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#
$
%%
&
'
(( based on the generated code tree and the frequency counts.
2. Submit your program on Blackboard by 10:45 a.m. on October 23, 2014. One of the comment lines
should include the compilation command used on OMEGA.
Getting Started:
1. Suppose the input frequency counts are: 6 4 5 7. The following tree is for the listed conventional
Huffman code.
4 5 6 7
13
22
0
0
1 0
1
1
9
b c a d
6 10
4 00
5 01
7 11
The weighted sum is 6•2 + 4•2 + 5•2 + 7•2 = 44
Now suppose the ordered character set is {a, b, c, d} with the indicated frequency counts. If the strings
“abc” and “bad” are compressed to “100001” and “001011”, respectively, they do not compare the
same way as their uncompressed counterparts. Order preservation is guaranteed only when the leaf order
is consistent with the order of the character set.
2. For the same input sequence, the following tree is for the approximate order-preserving Huffman
code. At each step in its construction, we greedily merge the two adjacent trees whose weights have
the smallest sum.
4 5
9
0 1
6
0
15
1
7
22
0 1
a
b c
d
6 00
4 010
5 011
7 1
The weighted sum is 6•2 + 4•3 + 5•3 + 7•1 = 46.
Now, the strings “abc” and “bad” will be compressed to “00010011” and “010001”, respectively, but
the sum has not been minimized.
3. For the same input sequence, the following tree is for the exact order-preserving Huffman code. It
was constructed using dynamic programming to determine optimal order-preserving subtrees.
6 4 5 7
12
22
0
0
1 0
1
1
10
a b c d
6 00
4 01
5 10
7 11
The weighted sum is 6•2 + 4•2 + 5•2 + 7•2 = 44.
4. It is not difficult to see that the weighted sums for the three different approaches have the following
relationship: conventional ≤ exact ≤ approximate.
5. Your approximate solution must use a heap to achieve

Θ(n logn) time. Submissions taking

Θ# n2
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(
time will be severely penalized.
6. Input is to be read from standard input. Do not prompt for a file name.
7. Heap-based code (http://ranger.uta.edu/~weems/NOTES2320/huffman.freq.c) for conventional Huffman
coding with frequencies is available on the course webpage. It may be modified significantly to
achieve part (a). You will want each heap entry to correspond to two adjacent subtrees that could be
merged. After a PQdelmin() determines the merge to apply, you will need PQdelete() to
discard unneeded candidate(s) (due to the merge) and a PQinsert() to include new candidate(s)
(also resulting from the merge). Handles facilitate this.
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