PRG 211 All participations

PRG 211 All participations

Entire Course Link

https://plus.google.com/u/0/108200033792883877670/posts/dWT4sDYbQKM

 

 PRG/211

ALGORITHMS AND LOGIC FOR COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

 

The Latest Version A+ Study Guide

 

**********************************************

PRG 211 All participations Link

https://uopcourses.com/category/prg-211-all-participations/

**********************************************

 

 

PRG 211 Week 1 Ch. 0, Prelude to Programming
 

 

Read Ch. 0, “Introduction,” of Prelude to Programming
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 1 Ch. 1, Prelude to Programming
 

 

Read Ch. 1, “An Introduction to Programming,” of Prelude to Programming
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 1 Ch. 2, Prelude to Programming
 

Read Ch. 2, “Data Representation,” of Prelude to Programming

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 1 Ch. 1, A Guide to Working with Visual Logic®
 

 

Read Ch. 1, “Input, Process, Output,” of A Guide to Working With Visual Logic®
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 1 Supporting Activity: Visual Logic® Exercise
 

Prepare for this activity by following the instructions noted in the student task, “Visual Logic®Installation,” to receive your VLSig file.

Review Ch. 1, “Input, Process, Output,” of A Guide to Working With Visual Logic®.

Complete the steps in “Weekly Paycheck Program,” of Ch. 1, “Input, Process, Output,” of A Guide to Working With Visual Logic®.

Post any comments, questions, etc., that you have, and attach your vls file. What challenges did you encounter when creating your first Visual Logic® flowchart?

 

 
 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 2 Ch. 2, Starting Out With Programming Logic and Design
 

 

Read Ch. 2, “Input, Processing, and Output,” of Starting Out With Programming Logic & Desig
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 2 Ch. 3, Prelude to Programming
 

 

Read Ch. 3, “Developing a Program,” of Prelude to Programming.
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 2 Supporting Activity: Programming Basics
 

Review Lesson 1, “Programming Basics,” of the Lynda.com® video “Foundations of Programming: Fundamentals” with Simon Allardice.

Respond to the following:

 

 

 

What is a program?
 

 

What are some of the programming languages?
 

 

What is the difference between a compiler and an interpreter?
 

 

What is source code?
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 2 Supporting Activity: Lynda.com®: Pseudocode
 

Watch the topic “Writing pseudocode” of Lesson 9, “Programming Style,” of the Lynda.com® video “Foundations of Programming: Fundamentals” with Simon Allardice.

Consider the following:

 

 

 

How is pseudocode used in designing programs?
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 2 Supporting Activity: Modular Programming
 

Respond to the following:

 

 

 

Explain what is meant by a modular approach to programming.
 

 

Why is this approach important?
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 3 Ch. 4, Prelude to Programming
 

 

Read pages 179 to 213 of Ch. 4, “Selection Structures: Making Decisions,” of Prelude to Programming
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 3 Ch. 5, Prelude to Programming
 

 

Read pages 255 to 301 of Ch. 5, “Repetition Structures: Looping,” of Prelude to Programming
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 3 Ch. 3, A Guide to Working With Visual Logic®
 

 

Read pages 37 to 52 of Ch. 3, “While Loops,” of A Guide to Working With Visual Logic®
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 3 Supporting Activity: Software Program Control Flow
 

Respond to the following questions:

 

 

 

What is sequential flow of a program?
 

 

What is branching within a program?
 

 

How is branching controlled
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 3 Supporting Activity: Single-Dual Alternatives and Case Structures
 

Respond to the following question:

 

 

 

What are the similarities and differences between single alternative structures, dual alternative structures, and case structures? Provide an example of one of the three control structures using pseudocode. Try to provide an example that has not already been posted.
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 4 Ch. 7, Prelude to Programming
 

 

Read Ch. 7, “Arrays: Lists and Tables,” of Prelude to Programming
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 4 Ch. 8, Starting out with Programming Logic and Design
 

 

Read Ch. 8, “Arrays,” of Starting out with Programming Logic and Design
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 4 Ch. 5, A Guide to Working With Visual Logic®
 

 

Read Ch. 5, “Arrays,” of A Guide to Working With Visual Logic®.
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 4 Lynda.com®: Foundations of Programming: Data Structures
 

Watch the following lessons of the Lynda.com® course “Foundations of Programming: Data Structures” with Simon Allardice.

 

 

 

Lesson 1, “Simples Structures and Basic Arrays.”
 

 

Lesson 2, “Advanced Array Behavior.”
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 4 Supporting Activity: Drug Company Data
 

A regional drug company is tracking a particular generic drug and its brand name alternative. Because this data is collected for only 15 days and the sales are rare, the IT department does not want to enter the data into its database. The data must include the following:

 

 

 

Generic or brand name sold
 

 

Amount sold
 

 

Respond to the following questions:

 

 

 

Can an array or parallel array structure be used to store this information?
 

 

What data types would be used in the structure to store this information?
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 5 Ch. 10, Prelude to Programming
 

 

Read Ch. 10, “Sequential Data Files,” of Prelude to Programming
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 5 Ch. 11, Prelude to Programming
 

 

Read Ch. 11, “Object-Oriented and Event Driven-Driven Programming,” of Prelude to Programming
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 5 Ch. 14, Starting Out With Programming Logic and Design
 

 

Read Ch. 14, “Object-Oriented Programming,” of Starting Out With Programming Logic and Design
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 5 Supporting Activity: Direct, Random, and Sequential Access Files
 

Respond to the following question:

 

 

 

In which situations would you use a direct access or random access file instead of a sequential access file? Give a specific example and explain your reasoning.
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

PRG 211 Week 5 Supporting Activity: Object-Oriented Concepts
 

Respond to the following questions:

 

 

 

What is object-oriented programming?
 

 

What are the differences between a class and an object?
 

 

What are the similarities and differences between procedures and objects?
 

 

 

 
 

 
Powered by